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Text-only newsletter stories for Issue 10 Vl. 9


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How to Curate Art for Your Home

The right artwork can transform any room in a home, plus it has the unique ability to display the homeowner’s personality, character, and energy. Because of that, choosing the right pieces can feel a little overwhelming sometimes. Use the below guidelines to help you get started.

Find a Statement Piece

One of the easiest ways to select art for a room is by starting with one central piece. This could be a meaningful photograph, colorful painting, or eclectic print. Once you find one piece you really love, use it as an anchor and select other pieces to complement it.

Play with Colors

Often, people get caught up in the idea that artwork must match the color theme of the room it’s displayed in. Although this is a great starting place, don’t be afraid to think outside the box and choose art in contrasting colors to catch the eye or try implementing black, white, or gray pieces.

Be Selective with Size

When selecting artwork for a room, knowing where it will be placed on the wall can help determine sizing. As a general rule of thumb, pieces of art should be hung about 57 to 60 inches from the ground and leave 6 to 8 inches between them and the top of furniture.

Try a Gallery Wall

If you have a large wall begging to be filled, a gallery wall could be a great option. This allows you to incorporate a lot of different pieces in one place. Your gallery wall could contain artwork and images of the same texture, color, and material or you can mix and match different prints, photographs, décor pieces, and frames.

Grocery Shopping on a Budget

As a homeowner, it’s never a bad idea to look at different ways to cut costs and one of the easiest areas to tweak is your grocery budget. Take a look at the tips below to help you tighten it up.

Test out stores. Take a couple weeks to trial some neighborhood grocery stores and track how much your staple foods cost at each, such as eggs, milk, vegetables, and chicken. Once you’ve completed your survey, determine if one store offers more savings overall and try to primarily shop at that location.

Plan ahead. Everyone has heard the sound advice to never shop while hungry. But, it’s also a good idea to never shop without a well formulated grocery list. Before heading to the store, outline your meals for the week, keeping in mind breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. Don’t forget any condiments, seasonings, etc. you may be out of. Then stick to the list, preventing overspending.

Shop local. Farmers markets are an amazing way to save money. Not only are you likely to find amazing deals, but often the quality of the fruits and vegetables is higher than at chain grocery stores. Many of these markets offer “stuff your bag” deals where they allow you to fill a bag with as many yummy items as you can and pay one set price.

Don’t knock the freezer. Although it’s best to pick up fresh groceries, there are certain items you can venture into the frozen aisle for, like organic fruits and veggies. Plus, if there’s a great deal on a fresh item, like chicken, consider buying in bulk and safely freezing some for later.

Take 5: Top Tips for the First-Time Homeowners

Owning your first home is one of the biggest milestones in an individual’s life. Once it’s finally all yours, you want to make sure you avoid common rookie mistakes like the ones below.

  1. Starting major renovations right away. With all the excitement and energy from the closing table still lingering, it’s easy to get caught up in home improvements. Before starting a major renovation, give yourself 2 or 3 months of living in your home to really solidify that it’s the right financial investment and what you really want.

  2. Ignoring routine maintenance. Ignoring routine upkeep and maintenance, such as prepping your pipes for winter, clearing gutters, and filling cracks near doors and walls, can cause big issues down the line. Make sure to budget both time and money for these tasks.

  3. Hiring the cheapest option. If you have a job that a professional, don’t always opt for the cheapest option. Makes sure to get several estimates for the work and look online for reviews. Once you do your research, select the professional you think will do the best job.

  4. Not knowing your property boundaries. During closing, you may receive a survey of your home and property, however it’s crucial you know exactly where your property lines are. Outline this before your start planting or building fences or structures.

  5. Neglecting the exterior of your home. Once you move in, it’s easy to focus your energy and effort on the interior. But don’t forget to give your exterior some TLC with thoughtful landscaping and regular checks to ensure weeds are taken care of and water is draining correctly.


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