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Text-only newsletter stories for Issue 8 Vl. 10


Feel free to use these stories in your own newsletter designs. If you want to use a completed newsletter template, check out the latest issues of Hometalk and Real Estate Advisor. If you want to use a completely editable newsletter template, please see the News & Views template.


Headline: Ready to go rustic?

Rustic and farmhouse interior design are still in, and it isn’t going anywhere any time soon! If you’re ready to hop on board this trend, try introducing some of our favorite ideas into a room in your home. Take a look below!

Exposed wood. Whether you implement this in a small way, such as a coffee table, headboard, or chair, or go big with your remodel and add wooden beams or create a plank accent wall, exposed wood is essential to a rustic-style room. Make sure to combine various wood grains, colors, and finishes to add more depth and texture. Fur. Whether you opt for real or faux, fur can be a unique feature piece and can bring together the room. Try a cowhide, bear, or sheepskin rug or purchase a fur throw for a couch or chair. Accent materials. Incorporate iron or stone accents in furniture and décor, such as bar stools, coffee tables, overhead lighting, chandeliers, fireplaces, mantels, shelving, candleholders, and more. Warm lighting. To give the room a cozy, relaxing feel, lean towards warm, yellow lightbulbs instead of LEDs or pick out some unique Edison bulbs for exposed lamps and decorative overhead lighting. Small details. The magic is in the small details. Paint wood panels white or gray and letter your favorite saying on top. Purchase wooden picture frames, farmhouse signs, terracotta pots, wood slices, and mason jars and arrange them around the room. Bold patterns. Mismatched quilts, layered rag rugs, and check-print chairs or blankets are great additions to any rustic room.


Headline: Let's Talk Doggy Door Safety

You’ve purchased a home with a large backyard and all your pup wants to do is be outside. But after the 10th time you have to get up and open the door to let him or her in and out, you start researching doggy doors. Long-term convenience with a fairly simple installation sounds great to you! However, before committing, you should consider how it may affect the safety of your home.

A doggy door is a home feature that can make your house more susceptible to burglary. These doors are almost always placed in a back door or wall of the home, putting it out of the line of sight for passing traffic and neighbors. If a robber is small enough, they may be able to slip right through the door or use it to reach in and unlock the door.

As long as you remain conscious and aware of the safety implications, there are several ways to secure your doggy door, keeping convenience in place while protecting you and your family. The first and easiest option is to select a door that includes a sliding bolt or has a self-locking feature. If you have a security system in place, you can have the design adjusted to include the doggy door and surrounding area. Many of these systems include sensors and cameras intelligent enough to ignore your pet’s body weight or shape but pick up on anything else. Alternatively, you could install a motion detector that will signal you on your phone or report to your security company if someone is coming in and out of your home when engaged.


Headline: Take 5: Catching a Leak

One of the more challenging parts of being a homeowner is when something goes wrong or breaks, you’re in charge of fixing it. And unfortunately, one of the most common issues can be the hardest to detect — a plumbing leak. Here are 5 tips for catching a leak.

Review your water bill carefully. Have you noticed that your most recent bills have been unusually high but you haven’t changed your regular routine at all? This can be a telling sign that you may have a leak in your home. Pay attention to water pressure. Although a shift in water pressure in your shower or kitchen sink can be caused by a clogged pipe, it’s crucial to rule out a leak. Check below your sinks. A great habit to get into is routinely checking under bathroom, kitchen, and laundry room sinks to ensure you don’t have a slow drip. Not only will this warp your cabinetry and cause mold, but it can cost you a lot of money over time. Inspect flooring, walls, and ceilings. Peeling paint or stains on walls or ceilings is an indicator that there might be some damage behind them. Make sure you regularly check the floors and sealant around appliances like tubs, toilets, refrigerators, and more for cracks or spongy areas as well. Don’t neglect basements and crawl spaces. “Out of sight, out of mind” could really cause a major issue for you and your home in this case. Make sure you set a reminder to periodically check your house for mold, corrosion, and moisture before you are dealing with foundation damage.


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