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Text only newsletter stories Issue 10 Vl. 5


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Headline: Big ideas for small spaces

Smaller rooms can be difficult to decorate, because if you don’t know a few important tricks, the space can end up feeling a little claustrophobic. Here’s how you can keep a room feeling airy and spacious, even if it’s just a studio apartment or an attic.

Breathing room
Your first inclination might be to arrange all your furniture flush against the walls. Though this may add a little extra room to move through the room, it’ll make everything feel more crowded and congested. Instead, try arranging items at an angle, or pull them six inches away from the wall.

Mirrors and strategic colors
Dark paint will make the room feel smaller. Instead, opt for whites, light grays, and other light colors. A well-placed mirror will also expand the room’s appearance—think of the times you’ve been in a restaurant and a mirror made the space look twice as large.

Multi-purpose items
Look for storage everywhere—you can keep books and DVDs inside an ottoman, or store blankets in a bench or hollow coffee table. If you don’t have room for a dining table, you can invest in a coffee table with a pop-up section.

Raise your window treatments
It’s common to hang your curtain rods just a few inches above your windows, but to make the ceilings appear taller, you can hang them just a few inches below the ceiling. It can have a dramatic effect.

Swap out the sofa
The sofa is likely the biggest, most unwieldy item in your living room. What if you swapped it out for a settee or a pair of comfortable chairs? You won’t lose much in functional seating, but you’ll gain some precious space and room for foot traffic.


Headline: Open house alternative: The Broker’s Open House

It doesn’t take much time to go from a perfectly organized room to a cluttered, chaotic mess. Papers pile up on surfaces, coats and bags end up on furniture, shoe boxes and shopping bags get stuffed in the first place you can find. But if you’re proactive, you can avoid the common clutter traps. Here are five ideas for reducing clutter:

You’re probably familiar with the traditional open house, where your real estate agent hosts an open house at your property for a few hours on the weekend, allowing prospective buyers and passersby to see the place in person. But there’s a different kind of open house, and it can be a valuable tool for selling your home: The Broker’s Open House.

At a Broker’s Open House, your real estate agent invites other agents and industry contacts to the property, so they can view it and see if it’s right for the buyer clients they’re working with. Rather than the typical weekend hours, a Broker’s Open House is usually held during weekdays, since there’s no need to plan for buyers’ usual weekend house hunting tours, and weekdays often work better for agents’ schedules.

The event itself isn’t much different from a typical open house. Your agent will play host for a few hours, showing other real estate professionals around the property. The difference is that a Broker’s Open House can give your property more exposure—each agent at the open house can then pass along their opinion to their buyer clients.

A Broker’s Open House cuts down on the window shoppers who might not actually be in the market, so you’ll have fewer strangers wandering through your home—everyone who steps foot inside will likely be in the real state business, so it’s a more professional setting.


Headline: Five steps for winterizing your home

The cold weather has arrived, and it’s time to get your home ready for the months of harsh conditions that are on the way. Here are five key tasks for winterizing your home.

1. Get your HVAC system inspected: Some things are better left to the experts. Schedule a tune-up with an HVAC professional—they’ll check for carbon monoxide, inspect pipes, clean/change filters, and get your system running more efficiently.

2. Reverse your ceiling fans: Did you know that there are separate settings on your ceiling fan for cool and warm months? You want it to rotate clockwise during the winter. It’ll force the warm air down and keep you comfortable at night.

3. Disconnect all hoses: This is the most common cause of frozen pipes. One way to reduce this risk is by putting your hoses away in the shed or garage for the winter. That way, if someone connects a hose they will hopefully disconnect it to put it back in its place. Also, if you see a hose out of storage it will be a red flag that someone connected it.

4. Keep an emergency kit: A blizzard can quickly leave you stuck at home with roads too dangerous to drive to get food and other supplies, and can even cause power outages. Prepare for the worst by stocking water, non-perishable foods, and plenty of blankets.

5. Clean the gutters: Clogged gutters can fill with ice and cause roof leaks from water damming. Another problem is the gutter can become heavy and rip off, causing other damage.


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