Login
Text only newsletter stories Issue 7 Vl. 4


Feel free to use these stories in your own newsletter designs. If you want to use a completed newsletter template, check out the latest issues of Hometalk and Real Estate Advisor. If you want to use a completely editable newsletter template, please see the News & Views template.


Headline: A great lawn starts now

Fall may have just began, but winter will be here before you know it. The best way to have a great lawn come spring is to get started now, and here are four tips that will kickstart your lawn before the snow arrives.

Aerate
Aerating pulls up pellets of dirt from your lawn, giving the remaining turf room to breathe and allowing water to and nutrients to get deeper. You can rent an aerating machine if you don’t want to purchase one, or you can call a professional.

Seed
Fall is a great time to seed your lawn, because that’s when turf roots are very active. The seeds need to germinate, so once you’ve seeded your lawn, water it every two weeks or so.

Fertilize
Fertilizer helps your grass survive those bitter cold winter temperatures. This is your last chance to fertilize before the snow covers your lawn, so use a fertilizer that’s high in phosphorus.

Mulch
Don’t feel like raking up leaves all the time? No problem—you can use them for mulch! Make several passes over the leaves with your mower, and it’ll grind them into a mulch that first serves as a barrier from the wind, and then will decompose into valuable nutrients for the grass.


Headline: Five Fall maintenance tips

These simple maintenance tasks can save you from expensive repairs and big headaches over the next few months.

 1. Take care of hoses and faucets: Disconnect your hoses before the freezing temperatures arrive, because they can cause water to back up in your faucets—and eventually cause the plumbing to crack. Then, if possible, shut off the valves for your exterior faucets.

 2. Winterize the lawn mower: Either run the mower dry, or use a fuel stabilizer to prevent the gas in your mower from degrading and damaging the engine.

 3. Clean the gutters: Twigs and leaves will build up in your gutters throughout the fall. Make sure to clean the gutters before there’s heavy snow, because the weight of both the leaves and the melting snow could cause the gutters to break away from the house.

 4. Get the furnace ready: Your best bet is to call in a professional to give the furnace a tune up, but at the very least you should change the filters.

 5. Inspect the roof: As snow accumulates and melts from your roof, it can cause major water damage if the roof isn’t in good shape. Look for loose shingles, rust, moss—anything that could lead to decay or water damage. It’s best to be proactive with your roof—repairs can be extremely expensive—so don’t hesitate to call a roofing professional if necessary. It’s worth it in the long run!


Headline: Produce storage mistakes

Everyone wants to make the most of their food and not let anything go to waste. However, there are some important things to keep in mind when you’re storing certain foods. Follow these basic guidelines to avoid food going bad too soon.

Half-used onions and garlic should be stored on their own. These, and other produce with strong odors/flavors, can affect nearby food and transfer some of the taste. You don’t want any onion flavor when you’re biting into fresh fruit, so keep these items separate.

Don’t put potatoes in the refrigerator. Refrigerating potatoes speeds up the rate at which they convert from starch to sugar. Instead, store them in a cool, dark place, like a cupboard or drawer. They should last last several weeks.

Store tomatoes on the counter. The best way to keep tomatoes fresh is out in the open, such as on a countertop. They’ll quickly become mealy and lose their flavor when they’re stored in the refrigerator.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Real Estate Advisor newsletter template
Hometalk newsletter template
News & Views newsletter template
Newsletter back issues